Coffee: Transforming Livelihoods & Communities

Agriculture amounts to 90 percent of Rwandan livelihoods, with about 500,000 smallholder farmers growing coffee. 

Agriculture amounts to 90 percent of Rwandan livelihoods, with about 500,000 smallholder farmers growing coffee. 

Join us in celebrating the plant that has transformed the lives of smallholder farmers across Africa’s Great Lakes region. The U.S. African Development Foundation (ADF), a small but essential tool in the Government’s foreign policy toolkit, is supporting nearly a dozen African coffee cooperatives and farmers in Malawi, Rwanda, Uganda to Burundi. ADF grants support the most vulnerable subsistence farmers by investing in their technical skills and capacity building needs for increased yields. For example, ADF grants support: farmer trainings in harvesting of coffee, use of fertilizers and compost, and appropriate bush pruning skills. Together with our African partners, we are increasing the yields and earnings from farmer’s cash crops which allows them to feed their families and reinvest savings into their communities. In northern Burundi, Kazoza n’ikawa Coffee Cooperative brings together over 600 farmer members from Matongo Commune. Our funding has helped support the construction of coffee collection centers, washing stations and a revolving credit fund for farmers to receive direct payment for their coffee cherries. Farmers travel from afar to the community washing station to weigh and process their cherries before receiving partial payment. They are paid roughly $0.30 per kilo and a revolving loan fund allows farmers to be paid on the spot, which serves as an incentive for other farmers to join the cooperative. As a result of our partnership and a great cherry picking season, coffee production has doubled for Kazoza n’ikawa Cooperative between April and June

Burundi: members of Kazoza n'ikawa Coffee Cooperative inspect dried coffee

Burundi: members of Kazoza n'ikawa Coffee Cooperative inspect dried coffee